<
>

South Australian government hands training exemption to AFL clubs

play
Daniher won't return for Bombers in Round 2 (1:29)

Coach John Worsfold says the Bombers' priority is to be patient in getting Joe Daniher's long-term health on track. (1:29)

Adelaide and Port Adelaide will be able to conduct full contact training from Monday, meaning they won't need to relocate to a Gold Coast hub as early as first thought.

The South Australian government granted an exemption to state's current regulations to the two clubs on Tuesday afternoon, bringing the Power and Crows' regulations into line with the rest of the league's east coast teams.

It has also raised the possibility of a Round 2 Showdown between the clubs at Adelaide Oval before they're required to relocate to a Gold Coast hub in around three weeks time. They're still required to relocate as the state's 14-day quarantine period for those coming across the border remains in place.

In a statement released on Tuesday night, Port Adelaide CEO Keith Thomas welcomed the decision.

"This afternoon's decision is a very significant gesture from the State Government and on behalf of the club we are very grateful for this exemption," Thomas said.

"The decision is important for a number of reasons, not least of all that it will allow our players and staff to remain at home with their families in at least the short-term as we prepare for the re-start of the AFL season on an equal footing with all other clubs.

"We understand this exemption comes with strict protocols and conditions. We totally respect this and have always maintained that the health and safety of our players, staff and the broader community is paramount.

"Port Adelaide understands it has a clear obligation as a high profile organisation to be a leader in this space and we take this responsibility very seriously.

"We are very proud of the way our health authorities have addressed this global pandemic and the manner in which the people of South Australia has enabled the State to be in the position we are today."