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How coronavirus precautions hurt these eight NFL draft prospects

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Bryce Hall's NFL draft profile (0:48)

Take a look back at some of the highlights that make former Virginia cornerback Bryce Hall a desirable player in this year's NFL draft. (0:48)

ENGLEWOOD, Colo. -- There was a lot to like about the 2020 NFL draft, a virtual production that saw the league's top decision-makers surrounded by children and dogs while they worked from their homes. As it turned out, travel restrictions and social distancing because of the coronavirus pandemic made for great TV.

But the process wasn't kind to every prospect, particularly those recovering from injuries. Without pre-draft visits to team facilities, a medical recheck in Indianapolis in the weeks following the scouting combine or a pro day to show their health, many players waited longer than they expected to be selected.

As Denver Broncos president of football operations/general manager John Elway said in the days before the draft: "Obviously we're going to get all the information we can. We're not going to have as much as we've had in the past. In some situations, there may be a little leap of faith. We're doing the best we can to get all the medical [information] we can possibly get.''

With that in mind, here's a look at some draft prospects most affected by travel restrictions and social distancing:


Bryce Hall, CB, New York Jets

Where we thought he might go: Middle to late third round

Where he ended up: Fifth round, No. 158 overall

The background: Hall played in only six games for Virginia in 2019 because he suffered a season-ending left ankle injury while blocking a punt against Miami in October. Before the injury, some thought he could be a late first-round or early second-round pick. Even after the injury many believed he was a second-day pick. But without a pro day -- he elected not work out at the combine -- he waited until Day 3.


Jaylon Johnson, CB, Chicago Bears

Where we thought he might go: Middle to late first round

Where he ended up: Second round, No. 50 overall

The background: Johnson played much of last season at Utah with a torn labrum in his shoulder and underwent surgery following the combine. He went through the medical exam at the combine before the surgery and teams did not get their own medical staffs to take a look before the draft.


Netane Muti, G, Denver Broncos

Where we thought he might go: Late third to early fourth round

Where he ended up: Sixth round, No. 181 overall

The background: Muti played in 19 games over three seasons at Fresno State because he tore both his left and right Achilles tendons and also suffered a Lisfranc injury this past season. Elway said the Broncos had a third-round grade on him, and when the sixth round rolled around, Muti was simply too good a value pick to pass up.


Prince Tega Wanogho, T, Philadelphia Eagles

Where we thought he might go: Early to middle third round

Where he ended up: Sixth round, No. 210 overall

The background: His injury flag was raised late in the draft process. He started 12 games last season at Auburn and was a second-team All-SEC selection, but was pulled out of Senior Bowl practices after the medical exam there and then did not work out at the combine.


Antoine Winfield Jr., S, Tampa Bay Buccaneers

Where we thought he might go: Late first round

Where he ended up: Second round, No. 45 overall

The background: Winfield's case was slightly different as injuries ended his seasons at Minnesota in both 2017 and 2018 (hamstring and foot, respectively). He went through the medical exams at the combine, but teams didn't get a last look with in-house visits before the draft.


Lucas Niang, T, Kansas City Chiefs

Where we thought he might go: Late second to early third round

Where he ended up: Third round, No. 96 overall

The background: Niang underwent hip surgery in November. Before the injury, the TCU product had been considered by many scouts as a potential immediate starter at right tackle as rookie. He underwent a medical exam at the combine, but a medical recheck in April or examinations during team visits likely would have helped his cause. Instead, he was the 10th tackle drafted.


Laviska Shenault Jr., WR, Jacksonville Jaguars

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Laviska Shenault Jr.'s NFL draft profile

Check out highlights from one of the more explosive players in the upcoming draft in former Colorado wide receiver Laviska Shenault Jr.

Where we thought he might go: Middle to late first round

Where he ended up: Second round, No. 42 overall

The background: Shenault suffered a core muscle injury last season at Colorado but elected to train for the combine. After running a disappointing 4.58 seconds during his first 40-yard dash in Indianapolis, he didn't run the second 40 and didn't do the jumps or position drills. He then underwent surgery in the days following the combine.


Terrell Lewis, OLB/DE, Los Angeles Rams

Where we thought he might go: Late second to early third round

Where he ended up: Third round, No. 84 overall

The background: He missed most of two seasons at Alabama with injuries -- a torn right ACL in 2018 and a torn elbow ligament in 2017 -- and then elected not to work out at the combine. He thought he would be able to work out at the Crimson Tide's pro day, which was canceled.