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Falcons' Hayden Hurst shares support for Cowboys' Dak Prescott speaking on mental health: 'I've got nothing but respect for him'

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Atlanta Falcons tight end Hayden Hurst said he approached Dallas Cowboys quarterback Dak Prescott after Sunday's game to express his support in the wake of what Hurst called "disgusting" comments made by Fox Sports 1's Skip Bayless about Prescott's opening up about his mental health.

Prescott recently shared in an episode of "In Depth with Graham Bensinger" that he sought help in the offseason for anxiety and depression brought on by the death of his older brother, Jace, and the coronavirus pandemic. Jace Prescott died by suicide in April. The quarterback's mother died of colon cancer in 2013.

In response to Prescott's comments, Bayless said on his "Undisputed" show, "I don't have sympathy for [Prescott] going public with, 'I got depressed' and 'I suffered depression early in COVID to the point that I couldn't even go work out.' Look, he's the quarterback of America's team." Fox later issued a statement condemning Bayless' remarks.

Hurst, who has been open about attempting suicide and dealing with anxiety and depression, said he was appalled by Bayless' words.

"To be totally honest with you, when I saw what Skip Bayless said, it just really upset me -- that Dak had the courage to come out and talk about that and how it affected his family, how it affected him -- and those [Bayless] comments, I thought, were just disgusting," Hurst told ESPN on Tuesday night. "For a guy to come out and talk about that topic and use his platform to try and help and save lives, I've got nothing but respect for him because I know how hard it is going through stuff like that.

"It hit my family hard. My uncle killed himself. My cousin killed himself. And I had my own stuff with addiction and my attempted suicide. I know how much courage it takes to come out and talk about that. And for a guy like [Bayless] to blast Dak on his show, on national television, I think that's just wrong. So I wanted to go up to Dak and talk to him and tell him how much I appreciated it."

Following the Cowboys' 40-39 win over the Falcons on Sunday, video captured Hurst stopping Prescott to say, "Hey, I've got a lot of respect for what you did, came out and talked about. Me and my mom have a foundation about suicide prevention. Respect the hell out of you for talking about it, man."

Prescott responded with a suggestion that they collaborate one day, to which Hurst replied, "Absolutely."

"I thought it was awesome," Hurst told ESPN. "I'm sure Dak Prescott doesn't really know who I am. But I know the courage that takes, because a lot of people don't like talking about mental health. They're afraid to talk about it. They're embarrassed. If guys like Dak Prescott can come out and talk about it, I think he's going to save a lot of lives. I think that's cool. I admire him. And I'll be a Dak Prescott fan forever. I think he's an awesome guy."

Hurst previously shared his story about attempting suicide in January 2016 when he was in college at South Carolina. He had an unsuccessful stint in minor league baseball as a pitcher due to a throwing condition known as "the yips" and started using drugs and drinking heavily, then tried to slit his wrist. He survived what he called his "come to Jesus moment," and now he tries to educate others about dealing with depression.

Hurst established the Hayden Hurst Foundation with his mother, Cathy, to raise awareness of mental health issues in children and adolescents by funding mental health services and programs through donations and fundraising events. The foundation will host a charity golf event Oct. 19 in Atlanta.